hi I read over the mock agreement and it seems to detailed as if you guys will be privy to all my personal information I am not allowed to have alerts or security features on my credit or the services will be deemed complete so this leaves me wondering why do you need all my personal info in such detail if I’m only purchasing tradelines? excuse me but this sounds very suspect….. 

One late payment can take as much as 100 points off a good credit score and 30 points off a fair to poor credit score. You may have simply overlooked the payment and your credit score should not have to suffer. Many creditors understand this and will work with you especially if you typically pay on-time. Write a goodwill letter requesting removal of the late payment from your credit reports. See a sample goodwill letter here.
Focus on correcting the big mistakes on our credit report. If someone else's bankruptcy, collections, or charge-offs are showing up on your report, you'll likely benefit quickly by having those removed. However, if an account that you closed is still being reported as open, it's probably best to leave it that way. Having an account reported as "closed" on your file can in no way help your credit score and could actually hurt it.
The total amount charged to you will depend on how many items on your credit report(s) you choose to have us correct or have investigated. CRA charges you only after an item is deleted/corrected. Based upon what you have told us about your credit situation it is estimated that the total charge for your services can be calculated by using the following chart:
Step 1: Tell the credit reporting company, in writing, what information you think is inaccurate. Use our sample letter to help write your own. Include copies (NOT originals) of any documents that support your position. In addition to including your complete name and address, your letter should identify each item in your report that you dispute; state the facts and the reasons you dispute the information, and ask that it be removed or corrected. You may want to enclose a copy of your report, and circle the items in question. Send your letter by certified mail, “return receipt requested,” so you can document that the credit reporting company got it. Keep copies of your dispute letter and enclosures.

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Thank you for sharing all the specific things you did to help your daughter. Your advice has made a world of difference! Most articles and blogs were saying the same vague things, but you shared your exact plan of action. I referenced your comments continuously for our gameplan to increase my husband's credit. In 11 months, his score went from 592 to 754! We are thrilled and now getting other areas of our finances in order (savings, 401k, etc). Hoping to buy a house in the next few years and needed to improve his credit score. 

When it comes to anything with credit repair I am always skeptical given the large amount of incorrect or incomplete information out on the internet. I own a credit repair business and have done all types of business and personal funding and asked some very hard questions when I initially reached out to them. Tommy was amazing and most importantly he was so honest and didn't try to fluff anything up. I actually learned a lot from him about credit and authorized users. I started working with them by adding individuals to my cards and I can tell you the checks are real :) This team of people are impeccable with their word and always follow through with what they say when they say it. I would recommend Tommy and his team to anyone looking to work with someone in this industry.
Credit card interest is among the highest interest a financial consumer will pay for credit or a loan, so it makes sense to focus on getting your credit card payments down first. As the key to good credit is paying your bills on time, keeping account balances low, paying off high-interest cards first, and taking out new credit only when you need it, are all good moves for credit card consumers looking to increase their credit scores. Focusing on credit card debt is a great way to boost your credit score, as lowering debt, lowering card balances and making payments at a faster rate are solid ways to hike your credit score right away.

If appealing to your current credit card company doesn't work, your next best bet is to try opening a new credit card. Though hard inquiries on your credit history, which occur when you apply for a new account, can temporarily ding your score, if your new card comes with a generous credit limit, it can more than compensate -- especially since your credit utilization ratio carries more weight than most other categories when determining credit scores.
Typically, credit card issuers report your card balance as of the statement closing date—not the payment due date—to the credit agencies. If you pay off the balance a few days before your card's closing date (look for it on your statement), then a low or zero balance will likely show up on your credit report. That will help keep your utilization down. "I call it the ethical credit-score hack," says credit expert John Ulzheimer, formerly of FICO and Equifax.
First, the basics: A key component of your score is your credit-utilization ratio—the amount you owe on your credit cards as a proportion of your card limits. Utilization is calculated for individual cards and in the aggregate for all your card accounts. The lower your utilization ratio, the better. According to FICO, consumers with scores of 800 or higher (standard FICO and VantageScore credit scores range from 300 to 850) use an average 7% of their credit limits.
As trade lines are used by credit reporting agencies to develop an individual’s credit score, credit scores vary, with higher scores generally given to individuals with more-favorable trade line reporting. Factors considered when calculating the credit score include the number of trade lines, types of trade lines, lengths of open accounts, and payment history.
In Canada, credit scores range from anywhere between 300 (for those who are just getting started and are building their credit from the ground up) to 900 points, which is the highest credit score that can be attained. That said, anything over a score of 650 should qualify borrowers for typical loans, while a score under this mark will likely make it more difficult to get approved for a loan.
Just because you have a poor credit history doesn’t mean you can’t get credit. Creditors set their own standards, and not all look at your credit history the same way. Some may look only at recent years to evaluate you for credit, and they may give you credit if your bill-paying history has improved. It may be worthwhile to contact creditors informally to discuss their credit standards.
Creditors make those calculations based on the data included in your credit reports, which are issued primarily by the three major credit reporting companies - TransUnion, Equifax and Experian. By and large, the entire credit score range stands between 350 and 800. The higher your credit score, the easier it is to get loans and credit. The lower your credit score, the harder it is to get approval for loans and credit, and the more you'll pay (in interest) for the credit you do earn from a creditor or lender.
A lot of folks think that Increasing your credit limit just means giving yourself the opportunity to spend beyond your means. But, not necessarily. Increasing your credit limit can have a number of upsides if you manage your credit wisely, but mainly it will lower your overall credit utilization and increase your score provided you keep your utilization low and make your payments on time.
If you simply don't have a credit score because you have little experience or history with credit, you likely have a thin credit file. That means you have few (if any) credit accounts listed on your credit reports, typically one to four. Generally, a thin file means a bank or lender is unable to calculate a credit score because there is not enough information in a user's credit history to do so.
CRA's services include assisting you in disputing inaccuracies, misstatements or unverifiable information and other incorrect information reported on your credit reports. CRA does not charge in advance for any credit repair services. CRA, will not remove any derogatory information (defined as accurate information appearing on a Client’s credit report). Nor will Company assist Client on improving Client’s credit rating or record.
Every one of us has our own financial goals and authorized user trade lines can help a lot as we try to achieve these goals. You may be planning to get a loan for your car, pay for a mortgage for your dream house, or you may just simply be planning to position your financial health. Regardless of your plans, when it comes to managing your credit account, authorized user trade lines can always help.
Either way, you should always remove any errors or outdated information from your credit report — regardless of the actual effect on your score — as soon as you discover them. A clean credit report can give you peace of mind the next time you apply for a loan; you’ll know that an inaccurate credit score isn’t holding you back from qualifying for a better interest rate, saving you time and money in the long run.

Don’t use more than 30% of your credit card limit – Just because your credit card company allows you to spend a certain amount of money on your credit card doesn’t mean you should max out your card every month. To get your credit score up, keep your credit card spending to no more than 30% of your credit limit. Doing so will increase your score as you pay your card on time every month.
If you find an account that you don't recognize, it could be the result of an identity thief using your name to get credit, or a lender may be reporting the account in error. If a fraudster is at work, you can take steps to block the fraudulent information from your credit reports. If the negative account is the result of an error, contact the lender or whoever furnished the information in question, and file a dispute with each credit agency whose report lists the account. 

•    I then added her to 3 of my credit cards as an authorized user. I choose the oldest with high credit limits.(I did not give her the cards to use-only added her as an authorized user for my own protection) BEFORE being added as an authorized user be SURE you know the credit history and habits of the owner of the account. If there is a late payment on their account this will be reflected on YOUR credit history!
“The Federal Reserve’s Regulation B, which implements the 1974 Equal Credit Opportunity Act, requires that information on spousal authorized user accounts be reported to the credit bureaus and considered when lenders evaluate credit history. Since creditors generally furnish to the credit bureaus information on all authorized user accounts, without indicating which are spouses and which are not, credit scoring modelers cannot distinguish spousal from non‐spousal authorized user accounts. This effectively requires that all authorized user accounts receive similar treatment. Consequently, becoming an authorized user on an old account with a good payment history, may improve an individual’s credit score, potentially increasing access to credit or reducing borrowing costs. As a result, the practice of “piggybacking credit” has developed.”

Every situation is different and you could see a similar, lower, or higher increase based on your credit and the number of tradelines you purchase. To find out how to use tradelines to increase your credit scores visit our page called ideal tradeline candidate to see several scenarios where tradelines work to resolve credit issues. Tradelines work best in scenarios where you have no credit, not enough tradelines, or have nearly maxed out or maxed out your credit.
Now that you understand tradelines and how they relate to your credit score, you can see how important it is to regularly review your credit reports from all three credit bureaus. Keep in mind that having fewer tradelines on a credit report doesn’t equate to having a higher credit score. In fact, people who have several active tradelines in good standing (no missed payments or maxed out credit), including a good mix of credit account types and that have been open for at least two years, end up having higher credit scores.
You have the right to review any file on you maintained by a consumer reporting agency (i.e., credit bureau). You have the right to obtain a copy of that file from each consumer reporting agency free-of-charge every 12 calendar months. You may obtain your free copies on the Internet at www.annualcreditreport.com, or by contacting the consumer reporting agency directly. You also have the right to obtain a copy of your file free-of charge from the consumer reporting agency if you request the free copy within sixty days after you receive a notice of a denial of credit.
If you’ve never had a credit card before, your scores may be suffering because of that account mix factor we talked about earlier. Just make sure you make on-time payments — a new credit card account with a bad payment history will hurt you, not help you improve your credit scores. If you have a fair, good or excellent credit score, there are many credit card options out there for you. If you have a poor or bad credit score, read the next tip.

Credit card interest is among the highest interest a financial consumer will pay for credit or a loan, so it makes sense to focus on getting your credit card payments down first. As the key to good credit is paying your bills on time, keeping account balances low, paying off high-interest cards first, and taking out new credit only when you need it, are all good moves for credit card consumers looking to increase their credit scores. Focusing on credit card debt is a great way to boost your credit score, as lowering debt, lowering card balances and making payments at a faster rate are solid ways to hike your credit score right away.
Get an unsecured or secured credit card if you have bad credit or a limited credit history. A new credit card reporting to the major credit bureaus can help build or rebuild credit history. Never max out new or old credit accounts. Make small monthly charges and pay them off on time or in full each month. Credit scores will increase as long as you keep the balance 10% or less of the available credit limit.
Step 2: Tell the creditor or other information provider, in writing, that you dispute an item. Include copies (NOT originals) of documents that support your position. Many providers specify an address for disputes. If the provider reports the item to a consumer reporting company, it must include a notice of your dispute. And if the information is found to be inaccurate, the provider may not report it again.
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